FEATURE

Toolkit for "Walking Undocumented"

This toolkit for “Walking Undocumented” highlights a handful of TT classroom materials for teaching about immigrant students, including those who may be undocumented or from mixed-status families.

Procedure

 

Ten Myths About Immigration

Debunk commonly held myths about immigration with this Teaching Tolerance feature story. An accompanying lesson for grades 6-12 helps students consider how stereotypes begin and why people perpetuate myths.

 

Who Is an Immigrant?

In this lesson for grades 3-5, students explore family, culture and community to better understand who they are in relation to the people around them. Students read the story “Julia Moves to the United States” and find similarities and differences between Julia and themselves. Two options for extension activities are included. (This lesson is adaptable for younger and older students.)

 

Exploring Young Immigrant Stories

In this lesson for grades 3-5, students engage in a variety of hands-on exercises designed to foster appreciation for the diversity of their peers and of immigrants all over the world. Through visual and written texts as well as a kinesthetic classroom activity, students explore similarities to and differences from their peers and students living in far-away countries. (This lesson is adaptable for younger and older students.)

 

Truth to Power

In this activity, students write informed letters to corporate or elected officials, outlining their views on a social issue (for example, immigration or the rights of undocumented youth) and calling for specific action. Students will learn about formal letter writing and how it can be used as an effective advocacy tool. The activity comes with a rubric and student-facing handouts.

 

Ask Angy

Introduce your middle or high school students to Angy Rivera, a prominent activist for undocumented youth and immigrant rights in the United States, with this Teaching Tolerance Q&A and accompanying toolkit. These resources can help spark your students’ thinking about the pressing issues affecting undocumented youth living in the United States.