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A Personal Mission: Sammy Younge Jr.

Although raised in a prosperous and prestigious African-American home in Tuskegee, Ala., Sammy Younge found himself drawn most to the civil rights movement. While the cause cost him his life, his actions and determination helped to transform this Southern city.
by
Teaching Tolerance Staff
Grade Level
Subject
History
Social Justice Domain
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Informational

On Emancipation Day in D.C., Two Memorials Tell Very Different Stories

Two memorials have been built in commemoration of Abraham Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation-one in 1896 and 1998. And while they both pay tribute to the same event, they depict the African Americans within them in very different lights.
by
Joe Heim
Grade Level
Subject
Civics
History
Social Justice Domain
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Informational

Experiment in Fairness

Bayard Rustin was an African American leader who worked for the Fellowship of Reconciliation (FOR) in the 1940s and 1950s for equal rights for all Americans using nonviolence. In this story, he writes about the struggle for an African American man to order a simple hamburger at a restaurant in the Midwest.
by
Bayard Rustin
Grade Level
6-8
Subject
Civics
History
Economics
Social Justice Domain
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Informational

Freedom's Main Line

One of the earliest assaults on segregated transit in the South occurred in Louisville, Ky., in 1870-71. There, the city’s black community organized a successful protest that relied on nonviolent direct action, a tactic that would give shape to the modern civil rights movement nearly a century later.
by
Maria Fleming
Grade Level
Subject
Civics
History
Social Justice Domain