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THE MOMENT

Teaching in the Wake of Police Violence

Yesterday, the police officer who shot Atatiana Jefferson inside her home during a wellness check was charged with murder. But the grief and righteous anger at her killing continue today. How will you talk with your students about injustice, police violence and the fact that black lives matter? Here are a few places to begin.

THE MOMENT

Indigenous Peoples' Day 2019

Indigenous Peoples’ Day—still observed as Columbus Day on the federal level—is October 14. These resources can help you celebrate the histories and cultures of Indigenous peoples and Native nations. We hope you’ll make space in your classroom for these important lessons this Monday and throughout the year.

THE MOMENT

Mental Illness Awareness Week

This Mental Illness Awareness Week, we call on educators to see their vital role in removing stigmas that surround mental health issues, normalizing open conversations and recognizing the unique needs of students with historically marginalized identities or invisible disabilities. With these resources, we hope you and your students can take steps toward a world where—like Max at the end of our story "Washed Away"—you feel a little less alone and more prepared to face tough times alongside people who care.

THE MOMENT

Celebrate LGBTQ History Month

LGBTQ history is American history, and all of our students deserve to know that. This October, we hope you’ll join us in celebrating LGBTQ History Month. Here are a few of our favorite resources for learning and teaching about the contributions of LGBTQ people, including lessons, posters, articles and our podcast, Queer America, devoted exclusively to recovering this understudied history.

THE MOMENT

The First National Trans Visibility March

Saturday will mark a historic moment in the fight to grant LGBTQ people equal access to public life and justice. The first National Trans Visibility March will bring together members of the transgender, gender-nonconforming and non-binary communities with allies in Washington, D.C., and in marches across the nation. We echo the marchers’ call with this question: What can you do to make sure students feel visible and heard in your school? We hope these resources can offer some answers.

THE MOMENT

No Child Deserves This

Last week, a 6-year-old black girl and another unidentified 6-year-old child were arrested at their Florida school. The girl was handcuffed and taken to a juvenile detention center. Her fingerprints and mugshot were taken, and she was charged with battery. No child deserves such treatment—and no school should excuse it. Here, we share resources for creating and supporting schools where all children feel safe to learn and grow.

THE MOMENT

The Global Climate Strike and Student Action

Young people have always fought to create a future that is safer and more just—for themselves and for all of us. As students around the globe walk out this Friday to support environmental justice, we hope you’ll find ways to celebrate and support student action during the climate strike and beyond. Here’s how to start.

THE MOMENT

Our Fall Magazine Is Here!

In this issue of Teaching Tolerance magazine, learn more about the under-reported crisis of suicide among black children, the ways anti-LGBTQ organizations are targeting schools and so much more. And check out our poster featuring the advice Toni Morrison shared with her students: “If you are free, you need to free somebody else.”

THE MOMENT

Celebrate National Hispanic Heritage Month

National Hispanic Heritage Month is September 15 through October 15. And while we’re grateful for teachers who respect and uplift the identities of all of their students year-round, we also appreciate heritage months that offer a special opportunity to celebrate—and center—marginalized identities. To kick off the celebration in your classroom or school, here are a few of our favorite resources for honoring, learning and teaching about Hispanic heritage.

THE MOMENT

National Suicide Prevention Week

National Suicide Prevention Week is September 8-14. And while educators can’t—and shouldn’t—act as mental health professionals, they can advocate for students. They can help create schools and communities where all children know they’re valued and loved and where support is available if students find themselves in crisis. We hope these resources will help.