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The History of African-American Social Dance

Af Am Social dance/ted
Why do we dance? African-American social dances started as a way for enslaved Africans to keep cultural traditions alive and retain a sense of inner freedom. They remain an affirmation of identity and independence. In this electric demonstration, packed with live performances, choreographer, educator and TED Fellow Camille A. Brown explores what happens when communities let loose and express themselves by dancing together.
Grade Level
Camille A. Brown
Subject
History
Geography
Social Justice Domain
TEXT
Informational

Remarks on Signing the Immigration Act of 1965

The Immigration Act of 1965 abolished the "country-of-origin" immigration quota system and established a system of entry based on skills and family relationships with U.S. residents. In addition to his remarks about these changes, President Johnson announced asylum for Cuban refugees.
Grade Level
Lyndon B. Johnson
Subject
Civics
History
Economics
Social Justice Domain
TEXT
Multimedia

A Priceless Lesson in Humility

Felipe Morales' telling account of an encounter with a blind woman on the streets of Washington, D.C. was recorded for This I Believe. The NPR project features brief personal essays in which people from diverse backgrounds discuss how their values affect their daily lives.
Grade Level
Felipe Morales
Social Justice Domain