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Informational

I Didn't Know There Were Cities in Africa: Challenging Children's-and Adult's-Misperceptions about the African Continent

In her article, Randolph delineates the profound impact of perpetuating stereotypical representations of Africa and its people by arranging them into three levels and then providing recommendations for how to combat them when creating learning experiences for students in the United States.
by
TT Staff
Grade Level
Subject
History
Geography
Social Justice Domain
text
Multimedia

The History of African-American Social Dance

Why do we dance? African-American social dances started as a way for enslaved Africans to keep cultural traditions alive and retain a sense of inner freedom. They remain an affirmation of identity and independence. In this electric demonstration, packed with live performances, choreographer, educator and TED Fellow Camille A. Brown explores what happens when communities let loose and express themselves by dancing together.
by
Camille A. Brown
Grade Level
Subject
History
Geography
Social Justice Domain
text
Informational

A Personal Mission: Sammy Younge Jr.

Although raised in a prosperous and prestigious African-American home in Tuskegee, Ala., Sammy Younge found himself drawn most to the civil rights movement. While the cause cost him his life, his actions and determination helped to transform this Southern city.
by
Teaching Tolerance Staff
Grade Level
Subject
History
Social Justice Domain
text
Informational

Untamed Border

This chapter depicts the violent relationship between Tejanos (Texas Mexicans) and Texas Rangers in the late 19th century and early 20th century, culminating in the notion that “though a Tejano spent his life under the watchful eyes of whites, he was beneath all notice in death.”
by
Jim Carnes
Grade Level
Subject
History
Geography
Social Justice Domain