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My Identity

After growing up in foster care, Ashley, a young Native-American Caucasian woman, converts to Islam in hopes of finding structure in a life where it never existed. However, with that decision comes the risk of losing one of the few biological connections she still has.
Grade Level
Yasmin Mistry
Subject
History
Social Justice Domain
TEXT
Informational

This Land is Ours

“The Ponca’s challenge of the U.S. government marked a turning point on the long path of Indian resistance. Increasingly, after Standing Bear v. Cook, the fight for Native rights would shift from the battlefields to the courtrooms of the growing nation.”
Grade Level
Teaching Tolerance Staff
Subject
History
Geography
Social Justice Domain
TEXT
Informational

Si Se Puede

“In response to legislation that would have criminalized immigrants, thousands of high school students from across the country walked out of their classrooms and into history.”
Grade Level
Teaching Tolerance Staff
Subject
Civics
History
Social Justice Domain
TEXT
Informational

Untamed Border

This chapter depicts the violent relationship between Tejanos (Texas Mexicans) and Texas Rangers in the late 19th century and early 20th century, culminating in the notion that “though a Tejano spent his life under the watchful eyes of whites, he was beneath all notice in death.”
Grade Level
Jim Carnes
Subject
History
Geography
Social Justice Domain
TEXT
Informational

Home Was a Horse Stall

On December 7, 1941 Japan attacked Pearl Harbor and prompted the United States to enter World War II. While many Americans were concerned about the war abroad, they were also paranoid about the “threat” of Japanese Americans at home. As a result, many Japanese Americans were forced into internment camps on American soil.
Grade Level
Teaching Tolerance Staff
Subject
Civics
History
Geography
Social Justice Domain
TEXT
Informational

Blankets for the Dead

In 1830, the government began systematically removing all Native Americans from the Eastern United States. The removal of Cherokees from Georgia in 1838 has become known as the Trail of Tears. But there were, in fact, many such trails, as the Creeks, Choctaws, Chickasaws, Seminoles and other tribes were forced to abandon their homelands.
Grade Level
Teaching Tolerance Staff
Subject
Civics
History
Geography
Social Justice Domain