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The History of African-American Social Dance

Af Am Social dance/ted
Why do we dance? African-American social dances started as a way for enslaved Africans to keep cultural traditions alive and retain a sense of inner freedom. They remain an affirmation of identity and independence. In this electric demonstration, packed with live performances, choreographer, educator and TED Fellow Camille A. Brown explores what happens when communities let loose and express themselves by dancing together.
Grade Level
Camille A. Brown
Subject
History
Geography
Social Justice Domain
TEXT
Informational

Atlanta Compromise 1895

Booker T
Regarded as one of the most important speeches in American history, it was delivered by Booker T. Washington as a plea for racial cooperation in the South during a time of deep racial prejudice.
Grade Level
Booker T. Washington
Subject
Civics
History
Geography
Social Justice Domain
TEXT
Informational

Who Claims Me?

In Boston, widely regarded as the center of the abolitionist movement, black leaders called on citizens to resist the newly passed Fugitive Slave Law in 1850 in order “to make Massachusetts a battlefield in defense of liberty.”
Grade Level
Teaching Tolerance Staff
Subject
Civics
History
Economics
Social Justice Domain
TEXT
Informational

Si Se Puede

“In response to legislation that would have criminalized immigrants, thousands of high school students from across the country walked out of their classrooms and into history.”
Grade Level
Teaching Tolerance Staff
Subject
Civics
History
Social Justice Domain