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In a trailer park, isolated mothers pursue a shared dream

Metro Atlanta trailer park
“Zindy is a Mexican immigrant and domestic abuse survivor who lives with her five children at an isolated Atlanta-area trailer park. She notices that other park residents — immigrants from Mexico and Central America — struggle with the same issues she does, such as English fluency, reluctance to trust others, and limited access to education and other services. Zindy views their shared isolation as an opportunity and unites mothers in the community with similar cultural norms and practices — not to address shared problems, like domestic abuse, but to realize their common dreams for their children. This is the story of how they forged cultural ties and mutual trust, and the confidence to seek outside help in creating an escuelita (“little school”).”
Grade Level
6-8
Robert Wood Johnson Foundation
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Multimedia

Familiar food turns a refuge into a home

Refuge into a home
“Padam and Purna were forced from their homeland in Bhutan and trapped in camps in Nepal for decades before being resettled in an alien land: Clarkston, Georgia. The refugees have found some stability, but still feel frustrated and uprooted, which leads to domestic violence and suicide in the refugee community. Padam and Purna realized that familiar food is the first step to feeling at home. They have opened a food store and other refugee-run businesses, which offer safe spaces and sources of mutual support for all the Asian refugees in Clarkston, who are united by their experience of trauma.”
Grade Level
Robert Wood Johnson Foundation
Subject
History
Economics
Geography
Social Justice Domain
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Multimedia

Dealing with depression -- through faith and acupuncture

Dealing with Depression through faith and acupuncture
“Esperanza is an undocumented Mexican immigrant in Compton, California. She suffers from fears and anxieties caused by her four previous deportations and her high-stress role as her family’s caregiver. Esperanza doesn’t see depression as a health problem. When she shares her struggles with a local priest, she discovers a network of support that ranges from her compadres to a free clinic.”
Grade Level
Robert Wood Johnson Foundation
Subject
History
Social Justice Domain
TEXT
Multimedia

The History of African-American Social Dance

Af Am Social dance/ted
Why do we dance? African-American social dances started as a way for enslaved Africans to keep cultural traditions alive and retain a sense of inner freedom. They remain an affirmation of identity and independence. In this electric demonstration, packed with live performances, choreographer, educator and TED Fellow Camille A. Brown explores what happens when communities let loose and express themselves by dancing together.
Grade Level
Camille A. Brown
Subject
History
Geography
Social Justice Domain
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Multimedia

The Atlantic Slave Trade: What too few textbooks told you

Atlantic Slave Trade
Slavery has occurred in many forms throughout the world, but the Atlantic slave trade-which forcibly brought more than 10 million Africans to the Americas-stands out for both its global scale and its lasting legacy. Anthony Hazard discusses the historical, economic and personal impact of this massive historical injustice.
Grade Level
Anthony Hazard
Subject
History
Economics
Geography
Social Justice Domain