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LEARNING PLAN

Exploring Misconduct

  • How are we members of groups but also individuals?
  • What clues help me know when and how people are being treated unfairly?
  • How is my life easier or more difficult based on who I am and where I was born?
  • What clues help me know when and how people are being treated unfairly?
  • What advantages or disadvantages do I notice because of identity groups?
  • Grade Level
    3-5
    Subject
    Social Studies
    History
    SEL
    Social Justice Domains
    TEXT
    Multimedia

    In a trailer park, isolated mothers pursue a shared dream

    RWJF Image
    “Zindy is a Mexican immigrant and domestic abuse survivor who lives with her five children at an isolated Atlanta-area trailer park. She notices that other park residents — immigrants from Mexico and Central America — struggle with the same issues she does, such as English fluency, reluctance to trust others, and limited access to education and other services. Zindy views their shared isolation as an opportunity and unites mothers in the community with similar cultural norms and practices — not to address shared problems, like domestic abuse, but to realize their common dreams for their children. This is the story of how they forged cultural ties and mutual trust, and the confidence to seek outside help in creating an escuelita (“little school”).”
    Grade Level
    6-8
    Robert Wood Johnson Foundation
    TEXT
    Multimedia

    Woman Warrior

    RWJF Image
    Brittany Iron competes in the Crow Nation’s Ultimate Warrior Challenge. The Challenge spurs her to master canoeing, running, and riding. The race teaches the Native values of commitment and perseverance. To participate, she has to commit to abstain from drugs and alcohol. The Crow are reimagining what it means to be a warrior. They are now drawing on traditional rituals to combat the effects of centuries of stigma and trauma, and to rebuild the tribe’s sense of pride and purpose.
    Grade Level
    3-5
    Robert Wood Johnson Foundation
    Subject
    History
    Social Justice Domain
    TEXT
    Multimedia

    Shifting Gender, Securing Acceptance

    RWJF Image
    “Nineteen-year-old Israel Moncado spent his childhood being shuffled from one foster care setting to the next. After years of untreated gender dysphoria, and the bouts of self-harm and social isolation that often result from stigma, Israel visits his first LGBT center and discovers he’s not alone. When he finds a safe space in a transgender community, Israel begins to embrace his identity.”
    Grade Level
    3-5
    Robert Wood Johnson Foundation
    Subject
    History
    Social Justice Domain
    LEARNING PLAN

    2019-2020 Fourth Grade SEL

  • What does it mean to feel good about myself and how can I express that I like who I am?
  • How can I live, work and play with others when we have differences?
  • What clues help me know when and how people are being treated unfairly?
  • How is my life easier or more difficult based on who I am and where I was born?
  • What can one person do to create a safe, welcoming place for all?
  • Grade Level
    3-5
    Subject
    Reading & Language Arts
    Social Studies
    SEL
    ELL / ESL
    Math & Technology
    Social Justice Domains
    LEARNING PLAN

    Who we are and what we do

  • What groups do I belong to?
  • How do I know I’m part of a group?
  • How do I see myself? Is it the same way others see me?
  • How do people show that they are proud of themselves?
  • What rights do I have?
  • Do all people have the same rights?
  • How am I the same as other people? How am I different from other people?
  • Grade Level
    K-2
    Subject
    Reading & Language Arts
    Social Studies
    SEL
    Arts
    Social Justice Domains
    LEARNING PLAN

    Developing Radical Liberatory Praxis Through Critical Transgressive Education

  • How do our various group identities shape us as individuals?
  • What part do culture and history play in the formation of our individual and collective identities?
  • How do our intersecting identities shape our perspectives and the way we experience the world?
  • What is the difference between feeling proud and feeling superior?
  • How do we remain true to ourselves as we move in and out of different communities, cultures and contexts?
  • How do power and privilege change the way we express and present ourselves?
  • What privilege do people have based on their identity?
  • How could one person’s identity threaten another person’s rights?
  • How does struggle help define who we are?
  • How do our similarities and differences impact the relationships we have with people inside and outside our own identity groups?
  • What do we gain when we learn about the lived experiences of other people?
  • How do our various group identities shape us as individuals?
  • What are the challenges of celebrating what we have in common while also honoring our differences?
  • How do we connect in meaningful ways with people who are different from us?
  • What is the relationship between diversity and inequality?
  • How are rights understood and valued differently across cultures?
  • Why do some people choose to avoid those who are different? Why do others seek diversity?
  • How do different people or groups represent and express their power?
  • What does it mean to say that there is strength in diversity?
  • What problems arise when we relate to people as members of a group, rather than as unique individuals?
  • What is the difference between individual bias and structural inequality?
  • How do power and privilege shape the relationships people have with each other as well as with institutions?
  • How do bias and injustice affect the future?
  • How can the lived experiences of individuals reflect social inequities?
  • What is the relationship between prejudice and membership?
  • What shared beliefs have inspired social justice movements in history?
  • What is solidarity and why is it important to social movements?
  • How does power determine access and opportunity?
  • How is empathy a seed of social action?
  • Does everyone have an equal responsibility to stand up to injustice?
  • How can we effectively interrupt biased speech when we hear it?
  • Why is it important to stand up to injustice when those around you do not?
  • What responsibility does an individual have to make society better?
  • To what extent is collective action necessary to defeat injustice?
  • What factors are important to consider when choosing whether or not to speak up in the face of injustice?
  • How do our various group identities shape us as individuals?
  • Do our obligations to ourselves require us to stand up for others?
  • How can individuals learn to talk about injustice and remain civil?
  • Grade Level