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A Student Remembers Her School's 'Lunch Man,' Philando Castile

On July 6, 2016, Philando Castile was pulled over by police near Saint Paul, Minn., after being misidentified as a robbery suspect. He was then shot and killed by an officer during the traffic stop. In this StoryCorps edition, Chad Eisen-Ramgren has a conversation with his 10-year-old daughter, who was a student at the school where Mr. Phil managed the cafeteria.
by
StoryCorps
Grade Level
3-5
Subject
History
Social Justice Domain
text
Informational

A Personal Mission: Sammy Younge Jr.

Although raised in a prosperous and prestigious African-American home in Tuskegee, Ala., Sammy Younge found himself drawn most to the civil rights movement. While the cause cost him his life, his actions and determination helped to transform this Southern city.
by
Teaching Tolerance Staff
Grade Level
Subject
History
Social Justice Domain
text
Informational

Experiment in Fairness

Bayard Rustin was an African American leader who worked for the Fellowship of Reconciliation (FOR) in the 1940s and 1950s for equal rights for all Americans using nonviolence. In this story, he writes about the struggle for an African American man to order a simple hamburger at a restaurant in the Midwest.
by
Bayard Rustin
Grade Level
6-8
Subject
Civics
History
Economics
Social Justice Domain
text
Visual

The Negro Motorist Green Book

These images are from The Negro Motorist Green Book 1940 edition. The Green Book, published from 1936 – 1964, served as a guide for African Americans traveling around the country during the Jim Crow segregation era. To explore the complete issues visit the New York Public Library Digital Collections at https://digitalcollections.nypl.org/collections/the-green-book#/?tab=ab…
by
William H. Green (editor)
Grade Level
Subject
History
Economics
Geography
Social Justice Domain
text
Informational

Home Was a Horse Stall

On December 7, 1941 Japan attacked Pearl Harbor and prompted the United States to enter World War II. While many Americans were concerned about the war abroad, they were also paranoid about the “threat” of Japanese Americans at home. As a result, many Japanese Americans were forced into internment camps on American soil.
by
Teaching Tolerance Staff
Grade Level
Subject
Civics
History
Geography
Social Justice Domain