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The History of African-American Social Dance

Why do we dance? African-American social dances started as a way for enslaved Africans to keep cultural traditions alive and retain a sense of inner freedom. They remain an affirmation of identity and independence. In this electric demonstration, packed with live performances, choreographer, educator and TED Fellow Camille A. Brown explores what happens when communities let loose and express themselves by dancing together.
by
Camille A. Brown
Grade Level
Subject
History
Geography
Social Justice Domain
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Literature

(A)wake

In this poem, the speaker traces the senseless killings taking place abroad and at home, with a particular focus on the African-American community. The speaker also calls communities to action to "grow our hope and heal our hearts" in order to live together in peace.
by
Jessica Kobe
Grade Level
Subject
Civics
History
Geography
Social Justice Domain
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Informational

Una Vida de Esperanza

In this interview, Luis Rodriguez describes how the systemic demoralization he faced in school and society at a young age drove him to join a street gang and how writing his book, Always Running, was an attempt to call his son and other young people in similar situations to change their lives.
by
Luis Rodriguez and Sara Bullard
Grade Level
Subject
Civics
Social Justice Domain
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Visual

Hunger

In this cartoon, people of all sexes, ages, shapes and sizes are lined up outside the Gospel Mission, waiting for food. A mother in line remarks that they donated to this Mission just last year, inciting the feeling that circumstances can quickly change.
by
David Fitzsimmons
Grade Level
Topic
Subject
Economics
Social Justice Domain
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