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The Radical Truth of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., born January 15, 1929, became the most well known leader of the modern civil rights movement. But the truth of King’s legacy is often whitewashed and sanitized. On his birthday, MLK Day and year round, use these resources to provide students with a more complete, radical context of King's fight for justice—and discuss how his work still creates ripples today.

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Protests at the 2020 Olympics

This week, the International Olympic Committee announced that political protests at the 2020 Tokyo Olympic Games will be regulated. News coverage of the policy creates an opportunity to talk with students about voice, power and what it means to stand against injustice. These resources can help.  

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Disrupting Islamophobia Amid U.S.-Iran Tension

As news breaks about increased tensions between the U.S. and Iran, your students may encounter Islamophobic comments or sentiments. These resources can help ensure that you’re ready to interrupt and address Islamophobia if it appears in your classroom or school—and that you’re ready to help students do the same.

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Winter Break

This winter break, we hope you’ll take the time you need to relax and reflect on the year so far. We’re grateful for everything you do for students, and we hope these articles offer useful ideas for recharging and for recommitting yourself to the work that lies ahead in the new year.

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Appropriate Ways to Teach Kids About Slavery

This week, a photograph of a math assignment asking fifth graders to set prices for enslaved people went viral. Assignments like this are clearly harmful. But students can learn about slavery in ways that recover the lives and histories of enslaved people or dehumanize them; celebrate their resistance or erase their agency; recognize how slavery shaped our nation or ignore it completely. Educators can teach this hard history—and teach it well—in any discipline, to students of almost any age. Here are a few examples of how.

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The December Holidays

Many schools enjoy celebrating a non-religious “holiday season” but clearly favor Christmas in their traditions and decor. Moreover, important non-Christian holidays that don't occur in December are often overlooked completely. These resources can help your school community become more inclusive by reflecting on how and when holidays show up in your hallways, assemblies and classrooms.

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Thanksgiving 2019

As Thanksgiving approaches, it's important to remember that some Indigenous communities observe the holiday as a day of mourning. We hope you'll think about the ways you bring Thanksgiving into your classroom and consider how you can ensure every member of your school community feels respected and valued in the process. Here are a few resources to get you started.

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The 2020 Teaching Tolerance Award

We’re now accepting nominations and applications for our biennial Award for Excellence in Teaching. Here’s how you can help us find the next award-winning educators!

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Black Students Matter

Last week, a 7-year-old black boy came home from school with a realistic-looking gunshot wound painted on his forehead—by his drama teacher. The image understandably alarmed his mother. And it reminds us of the harm educators inflict when they insist they "don't see race." We hope you'll read and share these recommendations for protecting, respecting and celebrating the identities of your black students.

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Halloween 2019

Every year, we hear of students and educators whose Halloween costumes reinforce stereotypes, bolster systems of oppression or even make light of hate. In these cases, a simple conversation might have prevented a lot of harm. We hope you'll take the time to talk with your students about their Halloween costume choices this year—and think carefully about your own. Here's a place to start.

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