Teaching the Movement

Civil Rights History Instruction

Prompted by reports showing that American students knew little about the modern civil rights movement, Teaching Tolerance launched an investigation into the social studies standards states expected teachers to teach and students to learn. We found that few states emphasize the movement or provide classroom support for teaching this history effectively.

From our research comes this set of teaching principles and curriculum rehabilitation tools. This framework is perfect for history educators who want to improve upon the simplified "King-and-Parks" narrative and engage this critical content at the level of depth it deserves.

The March Continues: Five Essential Practices for Teaching the Civil Rights Movement provides a set of principles for educators who want to improve upon the simplified King-and-Parks-centered narrative many state standards offer.

Civil Rights Done Right: A Tool for Teaching the Movement includes five discrete steps for building robust, meaningful lessons that cultivate a deeper understanding of civil rights history.

Beyond the Bus: Teaching the Unseen Story of Rosa Parks and the Montgomery Bus Boycott helps educators to recognize and fill instructional gaps when teaching about the Montgomery Bus Boycott.

Teaching the Movement: The State of Civil Rights Education in the United States 2014 offers an in-depth look at state standards for instructional coverage of the civil rights movement and includes suggestions for how to improve them.

Teaching the Movement: The State Standards We Deserve identifies best practices and puts forth models for school social studies and history standards.

Teaching the Movement: The State of Civil Rights Education in the United States 2011—the first report of its kind—provides a national report card on the state of civil rights education.