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Celebrate Women This Black History Month

Historian Carter G. Woodson established the first Negro History Week in 1926—a celebration that later became Black History Month. The Association for the Study of African American Life and History, a group founded by Woodson, selects a new theme for Black History Month each year. This year’s theme is "Black Women in American Culture and History."

Historian Carter G. Woodson established the first Negro History Week in 1926—a celebration that later became Black History Month. The Association for the Study of African American Life and History, a group founded by Woodson, selects a new theme for Black History Month each year. This year’s theme is "Black Women in American Culture and History."

Teaching Tolerance offers several activities about African-American women designed for K-12 students. Many high school and middle school students have heard about Rosa Parks. But many strong, courageous women came before her in the civil rights movement. They included important figures like Frances Watkins Harper and Ida B. Wells. For older students, we also offer a discussion guide for Sexism in the Civil Rights Movement. Meanwhile, elementary students can read about Susie King Taylor’s contributions during the Civil War or participate in a trading card activity that honors true greatness. 

These will just get you started discussing black women in American culture and history. That discussion can—and should—take you through the year.