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Glenda Armand

Glenda Armand is a middle school librarian who taught elementary and middle school for many years. Her approach to teaching and to writing has been to recognize the uniqueness of her students and readers while celebrating our similarities, our shared humanity. This teaches tolerance. It also teaches acceptance, kindness, and sympathy. Ms. Armand believes that those characteristics are found in the message of Martin Luther King’s famous speech. Ms. Armand’s story-poem, The Night Before the Dream, combines her fondness for writing in rhyme with her embrace of that message which is still relevant
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Cathery Yeh

Cathery Yeh (she/her) is an assistant professor in the Attallah College of Educational Studies at Chapman University. She has been in education for over 20 years, beginning her tenure in dual-language classrooms in Los Angeles and abroad in China, Chile, Peru and Costa Rica. As a classroom teacher, Cathery visited over 300 student homes and integrated students’ lived experiences, knowledge and identities into the curriculum. Cathery’s research centers on critical mathematics education, humanizing practices, ethnic studies, and social justice teaching and learning. She is the co-author of the
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Tina Vasquez

Tina Vasquez is a journalist with more than 10 years of experience reporting on immigration, reproductive injustice, gender, labor and culture. She is currently a senior reporter at Prism, where she covers gender justice and workers’ rights. Previously, she was a senior reporter covering immigration at Rewire.News, the leading online publication devoted to evidence-based reporting on reproductive and sexual health, rights and justice. Vasquez’s work has appeared in the New York Review of Books, NPR, The Nation, Playboy and a variety of other publications. She currently serves on the board of
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Marian Dingle

Marian Dingle is a veteran classroom elementary educator of 21 years. Always passionate about mathematics, her early career involved advocating for marginalized students and families. More recently, she has moved toward public advocacy, activism and scholarship, fascinated by the intersection of mathematics and social justice. She has been a member of Building Leadership Teams, led grade level teams, serves on her district mathematics committee, the state mathematics advisory committee, and is on the executive committee of the Georgia Council of Teachers of Mathematics. Mentoring new teachers
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Dani Bostick

Dani Bostick is an educator, advocate, and former mental health counselor. Her work on trauma, child sexual abuse and white supremacy has appeared in the Washington Post, The Week, Marie Claire, Parenting, and HuffPost, among others. .tb_button {padding:1px;cursor:pointer;border-right: 1px solid #8b8b8b;border-left: 1px solid #FFF;border-bottom: 1px solid #fff;}.tb_button.hover {borer:2px outset #def; background-color: #f8f8f8 !important;}.ws_toolbar {z-index:100000} .ws_toolbar .ws_tb_btn {cursor:pointer;border:1px solid #555;padding:3px} .tb_highlight{background-color:yellow} .tb_hide
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Natalie Odom Pough

Natalie Odom Pough, Ed.D., is a visiting clinical assistant professor of education at Indiana University Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI). Her work and research interests include new educator attrition and curriculum design in the age of social media and social justice activism in schools. Natalie was named a 2018 ASCD Emerging Leader and is a member of the Teaching Tolerance Advisory Board. .tb_button {padding:1px;cursor:pointer;border-right: 1px solid #8b8b8b;border-left: 1px solid #FFF;border-bottom: 1px solid #fff;}.tb_button.hover {borer:2px outset #def; background-color: #f8f8f8
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Crystal L. Keels

Crystal L. Keels is the associate editor for Teaching Tolerance. Keels has taught literature and composition and upper-level journalism courses at the high-school level and at the undergraduate level. She has also taught introduction to business communication, introduction to research writing and digital literacy at the graduate level. In addition to earning a doctorate in English literature, Keels also holds a master’s degree in journalism and formerly served as a writer/editor for two magazine publications focused on issues of diversity and social justice in higher education. .tb_button
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Christopher Howell

Christopher Howell got his start teaching nine preschoolers at a small private school in Virginia Beach. After receiving his undergrad and graduate degrees from the University of Virginia, funded by the Gates Millennium Scholars Program, he went on to teach 4th and 5th grades for three years. He currently lives in Charlottesville, Virginia, where he teaches 5th Grade at Woodbrook Elementary School. .tb_button {padding:1px;cursor:pointer;border-right: 1px solid #8b8b8b;border-left: 1px solid #FFF;border-bottom: 1px solid #fff;}.tb_button.hover {borer:2px outset #def; background-color: #f8f8f8
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Dr. Daryl Howard

Daryl Howard, Ph.D is an equity instructional specialist whose work and research interests include race and cultural proficiency, social emotional learning, and the triumphs and challenges of African American male students. As a member of Maryland’s State Department of Education’s Task Force on Equity and Excellence for Black Boys, he researches and recommends policy and practice to disrupt harmful narratives, decrease disproportionality and elevate achievement. Howard is instrumental in the work of the Building our Network of Diversity (BOND) Project, where he leads initiatives focused on the
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Western States Center

Based in the Pacific Northwest and Mountain States, Western States Center works nationwide to strengthen inclusive democracy so all people can live, love, worship and work free from fear. We strengthen the organizing capacity of often-marginalized communities, with a particular emphasis on gender justice, racial justice and tribal sovereignty work. We provide training, leadership development and organizational capacity support to social movements and leaders committed to diversity, equity and inclusion. We convene culture-makers to shift the narrative and use culture as a vehicle for base- and