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Informational

On Emancipation Day in D.C., Two Memorials Tell Very Different Stories

Two memorials have been built in commemoration of Abraham Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation-one in 1896 and 1998. And while they both pay tribute to the same event, they depict the African Americans within them in very different lights.
by
Joe Heim
Grade Level
Subject
Civics
History
Social Justice Domain
text
Informational

Freedom's Main Line

One of the earliest assaults on segregated transit in the South occurred in Louisville, Ky., in 1870-71. There, the city’s black community organized a successful protest that relied on nonviolent direct action, a tactic that would give shape to the modern civil rights movement nearly a century later.
by
Maria Fleming
Grade Level
Subject
Civics
History
Social Justice Domain
text
Visual

The Negro Motorist Green Book

These images are from The Negro Motorist Green Book 1940 edition. The Green Book, published from 1936 – 1964, served as a guide for African Americans traveling around the country during the Jim Crow segregation era. To explore the complete issues visit the New York Public Library Digital Collections at https://digitalcollections.nypl.org/collections/the-green-book#/?tab=ab…
by
William H. Green (editor)
Grade Level
Subject
History
Economics
Geography
Social Justice Domain
text
Informational

Home Was a Horse Stall

On December 7, 1941 Japan attacked Pearl Harbor and prompted the United States to enter World War II. While many Americans were concerned about the war abroad, they were also paranoid about the “threat” of Japanese Americans at home. As a result, many Japanese Americans were forced into internment camps on American soil.
by
Teaching Tolerance Staff
Grade Level
Subject
Civics
History
Geography
Social Justice Domain
text
Informational

Blankets for the Dead

In 1830, the government began systematically removing all Native Americans from the Eastern United States. The removal of Cherokees from Georgia in 1838 has become known as the Trail of Tears. But there were, in fact, many such trails, as the Creeks, Choctaws, Chickasaws, Seminoles and other tribes were forced to abandon their homelands.
by
Teaching Tolerance Staff
Grade Level
Subject
Civics
History
Geography
Social Justice Domain