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The History of African-American Social Dance

Af Am Social dance/ted
Why do we dance? African-American social dances started as a way for enslaved Africans to keep cultural traditions alive and retain a sense of inner freedom. They remain an affirmation of identity and independence. In this electric demonstration, packed with live performances, choreographer, educator and TED Fellow Camille A. Brown explores what happens when communities let loose and express themselves by dancing together.
Grade Level
Camille A. Brown
Subject
History
Geography
Social Justice Domain
TEXT
Multimedia

The Atlantic Slave Trade: What too few textbooks told you

Atlantic Slave Trade
Slavery has occurred in many forms throughout the world, but the Atlantic slave trade-which forcibly brought more than 10 million Africans to the Americas-stands out for both its global scale and its lasting legacy. Anthony Hazard discusses the historical, economic and personal impact of this massive historical injustice.
Grade Level
Anthony Hazard
Subject
History
Economics
Geography
Social Justice Domain
TEXT
Informational

Atlanta Compromise 1895

Booker T
Regarded as one of the most important speeches in American history, it was delivered by Booker T. Washington as a plea for racial cooperation in the South during a time of deep racial prejudice.
Grade Level
Booker T. Washington
Subject
Civics
History
Geography
Social Justice Domain
TEXT
Informational

Slavery a Positive Good

A speech given by Senator John C. Calhoun in which he argues in favor of slavery, saying that it benefits enslaved people, enslavers and the United States as a whole.
Grade Level
John C. Calhoun
Topic
Subject
History
Social Justice Domain
TEXT
Informational

John Quincy Adams to the Inhabitants of the 12th Congressional District

A letter written by John Quincy Adams to the 12th Congressional District regarding the use of the "Gag Rule" to prevent him from reading petitions by enslaved people on the floor of the House of Representatives. Adams argues that the Gag Rule is a violation of petitioners' rights, and to ignore this violation would endanger the rights of all Americans.
Grade Level
John Quincy Adams
Topic
Subject
History
Social Justice Domain