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THE MOMENT

New Opportunities for Back to School

A new year offers new opportunities to create the schools our students deserve: spaces where all identities are respected and where injustice is named and addressed. If you, like us, are starting the school year with a recommitment to equity, these resources can help you get started with a policy check-up.

THE MOMENT

New Resources for Teaching Hard History

Our students deserve an honest account of our nation’s history. That’s why we’re proud to share our new and expanded Teaching Hard History resources. They will help you tell a more complete story of American slavery that starts with Indigenous enslavement and includes students of all ages. To teach our students the truth about our shared hard history, we’ll need to start where the stories—and the learning—begin.

THE MOMENT

Remembering Charlottesville

August 12 marks the second anniversary of the deadly Unite the Right Rally in Charlottesville. As we mourn last week’s attacks along with communities in California, Texas and Ohio—and across the United States—we hold all survivors in our hearts. In this edition of The Moment, we share three stories from Charlottesville—stories of a mother, a student and a district that responded to hate with not only love but with a commitment to justice.

THE MOMENT

Responding to the Mississippi ICE Raid

Yesterday, students were pulled from their first day of classes to say goodbye to undocumented parents and guardians arrested by ICE. Our thoughts are with educators and families across Mississippi and with those dealing with this trauma in the aftermath of anti-immigrant violence in El Paso. Yesterday’s raid was the largest single-state raid in U.S. history, but we know that these raids will continue. We hope these resources help you support your students and their families.

THE MOMENT

Responding to Attacks in El Paso and Dayton

We join you in mourning those lost to violence this weekend. Like many of you, we’re feeling angry, exhausted and heartbroken. We take some solace in offering these resources for supporting your students and communities and for doing what you can to fight hate before it turns violent. After losses like these, we know we must move forward. But we refuse to move on.

THE MOMENT

Let’s Talk About Baltimore

In racist tweets this weekend, the president again used dehumanizing language to describe a place that’s home to hundreds of thousands of people of color. When you talk with students about place, how do you uplift a diverse range of experiences, call out coded language and engage questions of justice? This edition of The Moment offers a few places to start, with recommendations for talking about Baltimore and stories of student and educator action that counter racist narratives about New Orleans and Detroit.

THE MOMENT

Puerto Rico and the Power of Protest

This week, residents of Puerto Rico stood together to demand accountability from their government. They saw their protests yield results with the resignation of Governor Ricardo Rosselló. When your students return this fall, you have an opportunity to talk with them about the necessity—and power—of standing together against injustice. These resources can help.

THE MOMENT

Is Your Collection Complete? What The Little Mermaid Can Teach Us About Class Libraries & Curricula

As fans celebrate the announcement that the newest live-action Disney film will feature a black actor in the lead role, we are yet again reminded of the importance of representation. This summer, we hope you’ll reflect on your own practice and check out these resources to ensure all students are reflected in your classroom and curriculum.

THE MOMENT

Holocaust Denial Isn’t Neutral

News of a Florida principal’s refusal to expand mandatory Holocaust education because he must remain “politically neutral” has been met with disbelief and anger. But it’s just an extreme example of a concern we hear all the time: Accusations of partisanship are used to pressure educators into silence on topics that matter. These resources are reminders that not every story has two sides—and it’s educators’ job to teach students the truth.

THE MOMENT

July 4th: Celebrating Liberty for Whom?

The Fourth of July is a quintessentially American holiday, but the celebrated right to liberty has never applied to every American. These resources can help you consider how July 4th fits into the complex relationship between the United States and its citizens of color and how you can bring this history and an important message to your diverse classrooms: There is no template for Americanness, and there never should have been.