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Being A Girl: A Brief Personal History of Violence

This blog was published on The Belle Jar on December 3, 2015. Please be aware this text contains mature language and content.
Author
The Belle Jar
Grade Level

Source
Reprinted by permission of the author.
Text Dependent Questions
Question
What can you infer about Madame Lemieux based on her reaction to Monsieur Pierre and what she tells her class?
Answer
She feels strongly that girls can do anything that boys can do. Based on the intensity of her reaction, you can infer that she may have been told that she couldn’t do something because she was a girl. You can also infer that it makes her angry that Monsieur does not let girls play hockey in his class.
Question
What does the author mean when she writes, “As if murder is the same thing as spreading rose petals on your bed or eating dinner by candlelight or kissing through the credits of a movie”?
Answer
She does not understand the phrase “crime of passion.” Murdering someone “out of passion” seems so far from the loving scenes that the word “passion” conjures up, that the use of the phrase seems ridiculous.
Question
The author writes, “Eventually I ... tell a man to leave me alone; I deliberately keep my voice steady and unemotional.” What does the word “steady” mean? Why would she want to keep her voice steady?
Answer
“Steady” means keeping in one position or stable. Keeping her voice steady shows that she is not afraid.
Question
The author starts a series of sentences with “A man walks into.” The final sentence simply says, “A man walks into.” Why doesn’t the author complete the sentence?
Answer
By not completing the sentence, the author implies that men walk into more than just these listed places—perhaps too many to name—and shoot women for something they’ve done or someone they represent.