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The History of African-American Social Dance

Why do we dance? African-American social dances started as a way for enslaved Africans to keep cultural traditions alive and retain a sense of inner freedom. They remain an affirmation of identity and independence. In this electric demonstration, packed with live performances, choreographer, educator and TED Fellow Camille A. Brown explores what happens when communities let loose and express themselves by dancing together.
by
Camille A. Brown
Grade Level
Subject
History
Geography
Social Justice Domain
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Multimedia

The Atlantic Slave Trade: What too few textbooks told you

Slavery has occurred in many forms throughout the world, but the Atlantic slave trade-which forcibly brought more than 10 million Africans to the Americas-stands out for both its global scale and its lasting legacy. Anthony Hazard discusses the historical, economic and personal impact of this massive historical injustice.
by
Anthony Hazard
Grade Level
Subject
History
Economics
Geography
Social Justice Domain
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Informational

I Am the Blood of the Conqueror; I Am the Blood of the Conquered

In this blog post, the author details the internal struggle she feels when coming to terms with the bloody heritage she shares with conquistadors like Christopher Columbus and the pride she takes in remembering, embracing and living out her cultural history.
by
Christina Torres
Grade Level
6-8
Subject
History
Geography
Social Justice Domain
text
Literature

The Fog Machine

This excerpt focuses on the lives of African-American students during the civil rights movement. After reading Dr. Martin Luther King’s “I Have A Dream” speech in class in 1963, students in main character C.J.'s school are asked to share their dreams at a school assembly.
by
Susan Follett
Grade Level
6-8
Subject
Civics
History
Social Justice Domain
text
Informational

“We Lived in a Bubble”

Elizabeth MacQueen is the sculptor of Four Spirits, a monument built to memorialize the four girls killed in the bombing of the 16th Street Baptist Church. In her memoir, she discusses how the project revealed to her how sheltered she had been as a child growing up in Birmingham.
by
Elizabeth MacQueen
Grade Level